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ipadm(1m)

Name
     ipadm - configure Internet Protocol network  interfaces  and
     TCP/IP tunables

Synopsis
     ipadm


     ipadm create-ip [-t] IP-interface
     ipadm delete-ip IP-interface


     ipadm create-vni [-t] VNI-interface
     ipadm delete-vni VNI-interface


     ipadm create-ipmp [-t] [-i interface,[...]...] IPMP-interface
     ipadm delete-ipmp [-f] IPMP-interface
     ipadm add-ipmp [-t] -i interface,[...] [-i interface,[...]...]
          IPMP-interface
     ipadm remove-ipmp [-t] -i interface,[...] [-i interface,[...]...]
          IPMP-interface


     ipadm show-if [[-p] -o field[,...]] [interface]
     ipadm disable-if -t interface
     ipadm enable-if -t interface


     ipadm set-ifprop [-t] -m protocol -p prop=value[,...] interface
     ipadm reset-ifprop [-t] -m protocol -p prop interface
     ipadm show-ifprop [[-c] -o field[,...]] [-p prop,...]
          [-m protocol] [interface]


     ipadm create-addr [-t] [-T static] [-d]
          -a {local|remote}=addr[/prefixlen],... addrobj | interface
     ipadm create-addr [-t] -T dhcp [-w seconds | forever]
          [-h hostname] addrobj | interface
     ipadm create-addr [-t] -T addrconf [-i {local|remote}=interface-id]
          [-p {stateful|stateless}={yes|no},..] addrobj | interface
     ipadm create-addr [-t] -T vrrp [-a local=addr[/prefixlen]]
         [-n routername]....  addrobj | interface


     ipadm delete-addr [-r] addrobj
     ipadm show-addr [[-p] -o field[,...]] [-d]
          [addrobj | interface/ | interface]
     ipadm up-addr [-t] addrobj
     ipadm down-addr [-t] addrobj
     ipadm refresh-addr [-i] addrobj
     ipadm disable-addr -t addrobj
     ipadm enable-addr -t addrobj


     ipadm set-addrprop [-t] -p prop=value[,...] addrobj
     ipadm reset-addrprop [-t] -p prop=value[,...] addrobj
     ipadm show-addrprop [[-c] -o field[,...]] [-p prop[,...]]
          [addrobj | interface]


     ipadm set-prop [-t] -p prop=value[,...] protocol
     ipadm reset-prop [-t] -p prop protocol
     ipadm show-prop [[-c] -o field[,...]] [-p prop[,...] protocol | protocol]


     ipadm help [subcommand-name]

Description
     The ipadm command provides a set of subcommands that can  be
     used to:

     manage interfaces:

             o    create  and  delete  interfaces  of   interface
                  classes ip, ipmp, and vni

             o    modify interface properties

             o    display interface configuration


     manage addresses:

             o    create and delete addresses

             o    modify address properties

             o    display address configuration


     manage TCP/IP protocol properties:

             o    modify TCP/IP properties

             o    display TCP/IP properties



     Note that ipadm is  used  to  manage  network  configuration
     manually.  The netadm(1M) DefaultFixed NCP should be enabled
     for  these  manual  configurations.  Many   of   the   ipadm
     subcommands  are  not  functional if the DefaultFixed NCP is
     not enabled. The ipadm  subcommands  that  do  not  function
     unless the DefaultFixed NCP is enabled are:


     create-ip, delete-ip, create-vni.  delete-vni,  create-ipmp,
     delete-ipmp,  add-ipmp,  remove-ipmp,  disable-if, enable-if
     set-ifprop, reset-ifprop, create-addr,  down-addr,  up-addr,
     disable-addr,  enable-addr,  refresh-addr, delete-addr, set-
     addrprop, reset-addrprop


     The following subcommands still continue  to  function  when
     the DefaultFixed NCP is not enabled:


     show-if,   show-ifprop,   refresh-addr,   show-addr,   show-
     addrprop, set-prop, reset-prop, show-prop


     Refer to netadm(1M) for more information on how to list  and
     enable NCPs.


     The various operands to ipadm subcommands are  described  in
     the "Operands" section, which follows "Subcommands".


     All of the configuration that is managed by ipadm is part of
     a  Network  Configuration  Profile (NCP). Any number of NCPs
     may be defined on a system, but there  will  always  be  one
     active  NCP.  Changes  made  using the ipadm command will be
     applied to the currently active NCP.


     There is one exception: congestion control settings are  NOT
     NCP-specific; they are global, and will be unaffected if the
     active NCP is changed.


     NCPs may be `fixed' or `reactive'. There is one  fixed  NCP,
     called  DefaultFixed.  This  NCP will have all of its confi-
     guration applied immediately upon activation, and the system
     will  not  make  any  changes,  regardless of the success or
     failure of any part of the configuration.


     There may be any number of reactive NCPs; the system defines
     one  reactive  NCP,  named  `Automatic'. The user may define
     additional reactive NCPs using netcfg(1M). Refer to that man
     page  and netadm(1M) for more information about NCPs in gen-
     eral and the Automatic NCP in particular. Reactive NCPs will
     be applied based on additional policy rules that are part of
     th profile, and the  system  configuration  may  be  changed
     automatically  in  response to changes in the network condi-
     tions, based on the NCP's policy rules.


     The ipadm command with no  subcommands  displays  a  concise
     summary  of  interface and address configuration on the sys-
     tem. The output contains all the interfaces  (ip,  loopback,
     vni,  and  ipmp)  configured  on  the  system along with the
     addresses configured  on  these  interfaces.  See  EXAMPLES,
     below, for more information.

  Required Authorization and Privilege
     The          following          subcommands          require
     solaris.network.interface.config      authorization      and
     PRIV_SYS_IP_CONFIG privilege.

       create-ip          create-addr
       delete-ip          up-addr
       create-vni         down-addr
       delete-vni         refresh-addr
       create-ipmp        disable-addr
       delete-ipmp        enable-addr
       add-ipmp           set-addrprop
       remove-ipmp        reset-addrprop
       disable-if         set-prop
       enable-if          reset-prop
       set-ifprop
       reset-ifprop




     In addition to the  authorization  and  privilege  specified
     above,  the ipadm subcommands create-ip, create-vni, create-
     ipmp, and enable-if need PRIV_NET_RAWACCESS privilege.

Sub-commands
     The following subcommands are supported:

     create-ip [-t] IP-interface
         Create an IP interface that handles both IPv4  and  IPv6
         packets.  The  address of the IPv4 interface will be set
         to 0.0.0.0 and the address of the IPv6 interface will be
         set  to  ::.  This  subcommand,  by  default, causes the
         information to persist, so that on the next reboot  this
         interface will be instantiated.

         An interface is implicitly enabled  for  IPv4  and  IPv6
         when  it  is  created.  See the disable-if and enable-if
         subcommands below, to disable or enable an interface.

         Note that lo0 is a special interface, called  the  loop-
         back  interface. It is a virtual IP interface and is not
         associated with any physical hardware. It is one of  the
         first  IP  interfaces  to be created on the system, with
         IPv4 address of 127.0.0.1 and IPv6 address of ::/128.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the operation is temporary  and  must
             not  persist.  The operation affects only the active
             configuration.



     delete-ip IP-interface
         Deletes the IP interface from active configuration.  All
         addresses configured on the interface will be torn down.
         Further, all the persistent information related  to  the
         interface will be removed from the persistent data store
         and, for this reason, interface will not be instantiated
         upon  reboot. To disable an interface from active confi-
         guration (rather than delete  the  interface),  use  the
         disable-if subcommand.


     create-vni [-t] VNI-interface
         Create a VNI interface that handles both IPv4  and  IPv6
         packets.  The  address of the IPv4 interface will be set
         to 0.0.0.0 and the address of the IPv6 interface will be
         set  to  ::.  This  subcommand,  by  default, causes the
         information to persist, so that on the next reboot  this
         interface will be instantiated.

         The interface is implicitly enabled for  IPv4  and  IPv6
         when  it  is  created.  See the disable-if and enable-if
         subcommands below, to disable or enable an interface.

         Note that vni is a special interface, in that  it  is  a
         virtual interface and does not have any hardware associ-
         ated with it. See vni(7d).

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the operation is temporary  and  must
             not  persist.  The operation affects only the active
             configuration.



     delete-vni VNI-interface
         Deletes the VNI interface from active configuration. All
         addresses configured on the interface will be torn down.

         Further, all the persistent information related  to  the
         IP  interface  will  be removed from the persistent data
         store and,  for  this  reason,  interface  will  not  be
         instantiated  upon reboot. To disable the interface from
         active configuration (rather than delete the interface),
         use the disable-if subcommand.


     create-ipmp [-t] [-i interface,[...]...] IPMP-interface
         Create a IPMP interface that handles both IPv4 and  IPv6
         packets.  The  address of the IPv4 interface will be set
         to 0.0.0.0 and the address of the IPv6 interface will be
         set  to  ::.  This  subcommand,  by  default, causes the
         information to persist, so that on the next reboot  this
         interface will be instantiated.

         The interface is implicitly enabled for  IPv4  and  IPv6
         when  it  is  created.  See the disable-if and enable-if
         subcommands below, to disable or enable an  IPMP  inter-
         face.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the operation is temporary  and  must
             not  persist.  The operation affects only the active
             configuration.


         -i, --interface interface,[...]
             A comma-separated list of interfaces to be added  as
             underlying  interfaces  to  the  IPMP interface. The
             specified interfaces must exist in the active confi-
             guration  to be successfully added to the IPMP group
             and must not be present in  any  other  IPMP  group.
             More  than  one  -i  option  is allowed. The command
             returns with partial success if the  IPMP  interface
             was  created but none of the given underlying inter-
             faces were added successfully.



     delete-ipmp [-f] IPMP-interface
         Deletes the IPMP interface  from  active  configuration.
         All  addresses  configured on the interface will be torn
         down. The command fails if the IPMP  interface  has  any
         underlying  interfaces,  unless  the -f option is speci-
         fied. Further, all the persistent information related to
         the  IPMP  interface will be removed from the persistent
         data store and, for this reason, interface will  not  be
         instantiated  upon reboot. To disable the interface from
         active  configuration  only  (rather  than  delete   the
         interface), use the disable-if subcommand.

         -f, --force
             If the IPMP interface has any underlying interfaces,
             specifying  this  option  removes all the underlying
             interfaces from the group first, before deleting the
             IPMP interface.



     add-ipmp  [-t] -i interface,[...] [-i interface,[...]...]
     IPMP-interface
         Adds one or more underlying IP interfaces to  the  given
         IPMP interface.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the operation is temporary  and  must
             not  persist.  The operation affects only the active
             configuration.


         -i, --interface interface,[...]
             A comma-separated list of interfaces to be added  as
             underlying  interfaces  to  the  IPMP interface. The
             specified interfaces must exist in the active confi-
             guration  to be successfully added to the IPMP group
             and must not be present in any other IPMP group. The
             command returns with partial success if at least one
             interface was added and adding the remaining  inter-
             faces failed. More than one -i option is allowed.



     remove-ipmp  [-t] -i interface,[...] [-i interface,[...]...]
     IPMP-interface
         Removes one or more underlying IP  interfaces  from  the
         IPMP interface.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the operation is temporary  and  must
             not  persist.  The operation affects only the active
             configuration.


         -i, --interface interface,[...]
             A comma-separated list of underlying  interfaces  to
             be  removed  from  the IPMP interface. The specified
             interfaces must already be underlying interfaces for
             the  given  IPMP  group.  More than one -i option is
             allowed. The command returns with partial success if
             at  least one interface was removed and removing the
             remaining interfaces failed.



     show-if [[-p] -o field[,...]] [interface]
         Show network interface configuration information, either
         for all the network interfaces configured on the system,
         including the ones that are only in the persistent  con-
         figuration, or for the specified network interface.

         -o field[,...], --output field[,...]
             A case-insensitive, comma-separated list  of  output
             fields to display. The field name must be one of the
             fields listed below, or the  special  value  all  to
             display  all fields. For each network interface, the
             following fields can be displayed:

             IFNAME
                 The name of the IP interface.


             CLASS
                 Indicates one of the following:

                 ip
                     An interface that is plumbed over an  under-
                     lying datalink.


                 ipmp
                     An IPMP interface that is created  over  one
                     or more underlying IP interfaces.


                 loopback
                     A loopback interface.


                 vni
                     A virtual IP interface. See vni(7d).



             STATE
                 Indicates one of the following for the displayed
                 interface.
                 ok
                     Indicates that the required resources for an
                     interface are allocated. For some interfaces
                     this also indicates that the link is up.


                 offline
                     The interface is  offline  and  thus  cannot
                     send   or   receive  IP  data  traffic.  See
                     if_mpadm(1M).


                 failed
                     Indicates that the datalink is down. If  the
                     interface  is part of an IPMP group it could
                     also mean  that  the  interface  has  failed
                     (that  is, IFF_FAILED is set). Failed inter-
                     faces will not be used to send or receive IP
                     data  traffic.  If this is set on a physical
                     IP interface  in  an  IPMP  group,  IP  data
                     traffic  will  continue  to  flow over other
                     usable IP interfaces in the IPMP  group.  If
                     this  is  set  on  an IPMP IP interface, the
                     entire group has failed and no data  traffic
                     can  be sent or received over any interfaces
                     in that group. See in.ndpd(1M).


                 down
                     Indicates that the interface is  administra-
                     tively  down, preventing any IP packets from
                     being sent or received through it.


                 disabled
                     Indicates that the interface has  been  dis-
                     abled  from  the  active configuration using
                     the disable-if subcommand.



             ACTIVE
                 Either yes or no, depending on  whether  the  IP
                 interface  is  being  used  by the system for IP
                 data traffic.


             CURRENT
                 For interface objects, in active  configuration,
                 it indicates any of the following flags.

                 b
                     interface supports broadcast


                 m
                     interface supports multicast


                 p
                     interface is a point-to-point link


                 v
                     interface is a virtual interface (for  exam-
                     ple, vni(7d), loopback), that is, the physi-
                     cal interface has no underlying hardware.


                 s
                     IPMP interface is marked standby administra-
                     tively. See in.ndpd(1M).


                 l
                     interface is an underlying interface for  an
                     IPMP interface. See in.ndpd(1M).


                 i
                     Underlying  interface   is   inactive.   See
                     in.ndpd(1M).


                 V
                     interface is a VRRP interface


                 a
                     VRRP   interface   is   in    accept    mode
                     (~IFF_NOACCEPT)


                 Z
                     Layer-3 protection of IP addresses  for  the
                     interface    has    been    administratively
                     enforced.


                 4
                     interface can handle IPv4 packets


                 6
                     interface can handle IPv6 packets

                 Note that b and p are mutually exclusive.


             PERSISTENT
                 Specifies the configuration that will be applied
                 when  the  interface  object  is instantiated on
                 reboot or re-enabled using the enable-if subcom-
                 mand.  It  can  be  any or all of s, l, 4, and 6
                 (see above). This field is not shown by  default
                 and will be shown only when all or persistent is
                 specified with -o.


             OVER
                 The underlying interface(s) over which the  IPMP
                 interface  is  created.  This  does not apply to
                 other interface classes.



         -p, --parsable
             Display using a stable machine-parsable format.  The
             -o  option  is required with this option. See "Pars-
             able Output Format", below.



     disable-if -t interface
         Disables the specified interface by removing it from the
         active  configuration.  All  the addresses configured on
         the interface will be disabled. If the interface  object
         was  created  persistently  to begin with, then the per-
         sistent configuration is unchanged.  To  re-enable  this
         interface, one should use enable-if.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the disable is temporary and  changes
             apply only to the active configuration.

     enable-if -t interface
         Enables the given interface by reading the configuration
         from  the persistent store. All the persistent interface
         properties, if any, are applied and all  the  persistent
         addresses,  if  any,  on  the  given  interface  will be
         enabled.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the enable is temporary  and  changes
             apply only to the active configuration.



     set-ifprop [-t] -m protocol -p prop=value[,...] interface
         Modifies an interface property to the value specified by
         the user. If the property takes multiple values then the
         values should be specified with a comma  as  the  delim-
         iter.  Only one property can be specified at a time. The
         properties supported on an interface and the  property's
         possible  values can be retrieved using show-ifprop sub-
         command. Only one property at a time can be modified.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the changes are temporary and changes
             apply only to the active configuration.


         -m protocol, --module protocol
             Identifies whether property should  be  applied  for
             IPv4 or IPv6 packets.


         -p prop=value[,...], -prop prop=value[,...]
             A property to set to the specified values.



     reset-ifprop [-t] -m protocol -p prop interface
         Resets a property of  the  specified  interface  to  its
         default value. If -t is not used, any persisted value of
         the property will be deleted. Only one property  can  be
         modified at a time.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the resets are temporary and  changes
             apply only to the active configuration.

         -m protocol, --module protocol
             Identifies whether the property being reset  affects
             either IPv4 or IPv6 packets.


         -p prop, -prop prop
             A property to set to the specified values.



     show-ifprop [[-c] -o field[,...]] [-p prop,...] [-m proto-
     col] [interface]
         Show the current and persistent values of  one  or  more
         properties, either for all the created interfaces or for
         the specified interface. Several properties of  interest
         can  be  retrieved  at  one  time  by  providing  comma-
         separated property names to -p option. If the -p  option
         is not specified, all available interface properties are
         displayed.

         -o field[,...], --output field[,...]
             A case-insensitive, comma-separated list  of  output
             fields to display. The field name must be one of the
             fields listed below, or the  special  value  all  to
             display  all fields. For each interface, the follow-
             ing fields can be displayed:

             IFNAME
                 The name of the interface.


             PROPERTY
                 The name of the property.


             PROTO
                 The name of the protocol  the  property  belongs
                 to.  The  protocols currently supported are IPv4
                 and IPv6.


             PERM
                 The read/write permissions of the property.  The
                 value  shown  will  be  r (read-only), w (write-
                 only) or rw (read-and-write).

             CURRENT
                 The current value of the property. For  disabled
                 interfaces,  because a value is not set, it will
                 be shown as --.


             PERSISTENT
                 The persistent value of the property. Persistent
                 values  are the values that will be reapplied on
                 reboot.


             DEFAULT
                 The default value of the property. If  the  pro-
                 perty has no default value, -- is displayed.


             POSSIBLE
                 A comma-separated list of the  values  the  pro-
                 perty  can  have.  If  the values span a numeric
                 range, min - max might be  displayed  as  short-
                 hand.  If  the possible values are unknown, ? is
                 displayed  or  if  they  are  unbounded,  --  is
                 displayed.



         -c, --parsable
             Display using a stable machine-parsable format.  The
             -o  option  is required with this option. See "Pars-
             able Output Format", below.


         -p prop,..., --prop=prop
             A comma-separated list of properties to display. See
             the  sections on interface properties following sub-
             command descriptions.


         -m protocol, --module protocol
             Displays properties  matching  the  given  protocol.
             Valid values are ipv4 and ipv6.

         For the supported  list  of  interface  properties,  see
         "Interface Properties" below.

    create-addr [-t] [-T static] [-d] -a {local
     remote}=addr[/prefixlen],... addrobj | interface
         Creates a static IPv4 or IPv6 address on  an  interface.
         The  interface  is  either  specified specifically as an
         argument or is derived from the  addrobj  argument.  The
         interface  on  which  the  address is being created must
         already exist. The created static  address  will  subse-
         quently  be  identified  by addrobj. When the command is
         invoked with an interface  argument,  then  the  command
         will  automatically  generate an addrobj for the address
         and will print the generated name to stdout.

         Note -

           Automatically generated addrobj names have the follow-
           ing forms:

           interface/v4            interface/v6
           interface/v4a           interface/v6a
           interface/v4b           interface/v6b
                 .                       .
                 .                       .
                 .                       .
           interface/v4z           interface/v6z
           interface/v4aa          interface/v6aa
           interface/v4ab          interface/v4ab
                 .                       .
                 .                       .
                 .                       .


         The IP address version is used in the automatic  genera-
         tion  of names and names are made unique by increasingly
         appending one or more of the  characters  [a-z]  to  the
         v[46] prefix.

         By default, a configured address will be marked  up,  so
         that it can be used as a source or destination of or for
         outbound and inbound packets.

         All address objects are enabled when they  are  created.
         See  the  disable-addr  and  enable-addr subcommands for
         instructions on disabling or enabling an address object.

         A persistent operation cannot be  performed  on  a  tem-
         porary  object. That is, if the interface is temporarily
         created, then one cannot create the address object  per-
         sistently.

         If the interface specified in the  addrobj  name  is  an
         IPMP  interface, a static data address is created on the
         IPMP interface. If the interface specifed in the addrobj
         name  is  an  underlying  interface for an IPMP group, a
         static test address is created on the underlying  inter-
         face.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the configured address  is  temporary
             and changes apply only to the active configuration.


         -d, --down
             Specifies that  the  configured  address  should  be
             marked  down,  that is, the address will not be used
             as a source or destination of IP packets.


         -a {local | remote}=addr[/prefixlen],...
         --address {local | remote}=addr[/prefixlen],...
             addr indicates a literal IP address  or  a  hostname
             corresponding  to the local or remote end-point (for
             point-to-point interfaces).

             If a hostname is  specified  its  numeric  value  is
             uniquely  obtained using the entry in /etc/hosts. If
             no numeric IP address is defined in the  file,  then
             the  numeric  value  is  uniquely obtained using the
             resolver order specifed  for  hosts  or  ipnodes  in
             nsswitch.conf(4).  If there are multiple entries for
             a  given  hostname,  an  error  will  be  generated.
             Because  IP addresses are created before naming ser-
             vices have been brought online during the boot  pro-
             cess,  it  is  important  that  any hostname used be
             included in /etc/hosts.

             If the prefixlen is not explicitly specified in  the
             command-line,   the   netmask  for  the  address  is
             obtained by following the search in the order listed
             below:

                 1.   using the order specified for  netmasks  in
                      nsswitch.conf(4)

                 2.   interpreting IPv4  address  using  Classful
                      subnetting  semantics  defined  in RFC 791,
                      and interpreting IPv6 addresses  using  the
                      definitions in RFC 4291.
             For  point-to-point  interfaces,  along   with   the
             address  of  the  local end-point the address of the
             remote end-point must be specified (for example,  -a
             local=laddr,remote=raddr).   If  prefixlen  for  the
             remote end-point is  specified,  an  error  will  be
             returned.

             Note that if the interface  requires  only  a  local
             address,  specify  it directly with the -a option as
             follows:  -a  addr[/prefixlen].  The  address   will
             automatically be considered a local address.



     create-addr [-t] -T dhcp [-w seconds | forever] [-h host-
     name] addrobj | interface
         Creates a DHCP-controlled IPv4 address on an  interface.
         The  interface  is  either  specified specifically as an
         argument or is derived from the  addrobj  argument.  The
         created  IPv4 address will subsequently be identified by
         addrobj. When the addrobj contains an underlying  inter-
         face,  this command creates a test address; when it con-
         tains an IPMP interface, it creates a data address.

         When the command is invoked with an interface  argument,
         then  the command will automatically generate an addrobj
         name for the address and will print the  generated  name
         to stdout.

         All the  address  objects  are  enabled  when  they  are
         created.  See  the  disable-addr and enable-addr subcom-
         mands for instructions  on  disabling  and  enabling  an
         address object.

         A persistent operation cannot be  performed  on  a  tem-
         porary  object. That is, if the interface is temporarily
         created, one  cannot  create  the  address  object  per-
         sistently.

         If the interface specified in the  addrobj  name  is  an
         IPMP  interface,  the  address  obtained through DHCP is
         created as a data address on the IPMP interface.

         -h hostname
             Specifies the hostname to  which  the  client  would
             like the DHCP server to map the client's leased IPv4
             address. There is no guarantee that the DHCP  server
             will be able to fulfill the hostname request.


         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the configured address  is  temporary
             and changes apply only to the active configuration.


         -w seconds | forever, --wait seconds | forever
             Specifies the amount of time, in  seconds,  to  wait
             until  the  operation completes. If no wait interval
             is given, and the operation is one that cannot  com-
             plete  immediately, ipadm will, by default, wait 120
             seconds for the  requested  operation  to  complete.
             Note that the default wait time is subject to change
             in future releases. The symbolic value  forever  can
             be used as well, with obvious meaning.



    create-addr [-t] -T addrconf [-i {local
     remote}=interface-id] [-p {stateful | stateless}={yes |
     no},..] addrobj | interface
         Creates an auto-configured IPv6 address on an interface.
         The  interface  is  either  specified specifically as an
         argument or is derived from the  addrobj  argument.  The
         created  IPv6  addresses  will be identified by addrobj.
         When the command is invoked with an interface  argument,
         then  the command will automatically generate an addrobj
         name for the address and will print the  generated  name
         to stdout.

         The system  uses  the  default  interface  ID  (for  the
         media-type Ethernet, the Interface ID is the MAC address
         of the interface) to generate auto-configured addresses.
         This behavior can be overridden using -i option.

         By default:

             o    IPv6 addresses will be auto-configured based on
                  prefixes  advertised by routers as described in
                  RFC 4862 and...

             o    IPv6 addresses will be auto-configured  on  the
                  specified  interface  using  the  IPv6  address
                  offered by DHCPv6 server as  described  in  RFC
                  3315.  (That  is, -p stateful=yes,stateless=yes
                  is the default option.)
         All the  address  objects  are  enabled  when  they  are
         created.  See  the  disable-addr and enable-addr subcom-
         mands for instructions  on  disabling  and  enabling  an
         address object.

         A persistent operation cannot be  performed  on  a  tem-
         porary  object. That is, if the interface is temporarily
         created, then one cannot create the address object  per-
         sistently.

         If the interface specified in the  addrobj  name  is  an
         IPMP  interface,  the  addresses  obtained  through IPv6
         autoconfiguration are created as data addresses  on  the
         IPMP interface.
         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the configured address  is  temporary
             and changes apply only to the active configuration.


         -i {local | remote}=interface-id, --interface-id {local
         | remote}=interface-id
             Specifies the interface ID to be used for generating
             auto-configured addresses.

             For point-to-point interfaces, the interface  id  of
             the  remote end-point can be specified (for example,
             -i local=lid,remote=rid).

             Note that if the interface  requires  only  a  local
             interface id, specify it directly with the -i option
             as follows: -i lid. The interface id will  automati-
             cally be considered a local interface id.


         -p {stateful | stateless}={yes | no},..
         --prop {stateful | stateless}={yes | no},..
             Specifies if stateful or stateless or  both  methods
             of auto-configuration should be enabled or not.

             If -p stateful=no is specified, then stateful  auto-
             configuration   based   on   DHCPv6-specified   IPv6
             addresses will not be performed.

             If -p  stateless=no  is  specified,  then  stateless
             auto-configuration  based  on  the router-advertised
             prefixes will not be performed.

             If -p stateful=no,stateless=no  is  specified,  then
             both  the  methods of auto-configuration will not be
             performed.

             With     the     -T     addrconf     option,      -p
             stateful=yes,stateless=yes is used by default.



     create-addr [-t] [-T vrrp] [-a local=addr[/prefixlen]] [-n
     routername] ,... addrobj | interface
         Creates a VRRP virtual IPv4 or IPv6 address on an inter-
         face.  The  interface is either specified as an argument
         or is derived from the addrobj argument.  The  interface
         on  which  the  address  is  being  created must already
         exist. The created vrrp address will  be  identified  by
         addrobj.  When  the command is invoked with an interface
         argument, then the command will  automatically  generate
         an  addrobj for the address and will print the generated
         name to stdout.

         If no local address is specified, a IPv6 link-local vrrp
         IP  address  based  on  the  VRID of the associated VRRP
         router will be configured.

         By default, a configured vrrp  address  will  be  marked
         down, and it will be later brought up or down depends on
         the state of the VRRP router this vrrp  address  belongs
         to.

         All address objects are enabled when they  are  created.
         See  the  disable-addr  and  enable-addr subcommands for
         instructions on disabling or enabling an address object.

         A persistent operation cannot be  performed  on  a  tem-
         porary  object. That is, if the interface is temporarily
         created, then one cannot create the address object  per-
         sistently.

         One cannot  create  vrrp  addresses  on  the  underlying
         interface for an IPMP group.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the configured address  is  temporary
             and changes apply only to the active configuration.


         -a local=addr[/prefixlen],...
         --address local=addr[/prefixlen],...
             addr indicates a literal IP address or a hostname.

             If a hostname is  specified  its  numeric  value  is
             uniquely  obtained using the entry in /etc/hosts. If
             no numeric IP address is defined in the  file,  then
             the  numeric  value  is  uniquely obtained using the
             resolver order specifed  for  hosts  or  ipnodes  in
             nsswitch.conf(4).  If there are multiple entries for
             a  given  hostname,  an  error  will  be  generated.
             Because  IP addresses are created before naming ser-
             vices have been brought online during the boot  pro-
             cess,  it  is  important  that  any hostname used be
             included in /etc/hosts.

             If the prefixlen is not explicitly specified in  the
             command-line,   the   netmask  for  the  address  is
             obtained by following the search in the order listed
             below:

                 1.   Using the order specified for  netmasks  in
                      nsswitch.conf(4)

                 2.   Interpreting IPv4  address  using  Classful
                      subnetting  semantics  defined  in RFC 791,
                      and interpreting IPv6 addresses  using  the
                      definitions in RFC 4291.


         -n routername
             Specifies the VRRP router name this vrrp address  is
             created  for.  For l2 type VRRP router, `routername'
             is optional as the VRRP router name can be  directly
             derived  from the interface (VRRP VNIC) this address
             is created on. But it will be  validated  if  speci-
             fied. For l3 type VRRP router, this option is manda-
             tory.



     delete-addr [-r] addrobj
         Deletes all the addresses identified by addrobj  on  the
         interface  specified  in  the  addrobj.  It also removes
         these addresses from the  persistent  data-store;  thus,
         these addresses will not be instantiated on reboot.

         If the address  object  is  a  DHCP-controlled  address,
         delete-addr  removes the address from the system without
         notifying the DHCP server, and records the current lease
         for later use.

         -r, --release
             If the addrobj is a  DHCP-controlled  address,  this
             option  brings  about the relinquishing of the DHCP-
             controlled IP addresses on the interface by  notify-
             ing  the  server  and  the discarding of the current
             lease.



     show-addr [[-p] -o field[,...]] [-d] [addrobj | interface/]
         Show address information, either for the  given  addrobj
         or  all  the address objects configured on the specified
         interface, including the address objects that  are  only
         in the persistent configuration.

         -p, --parsable
             Display using a stable machine-parsable format.  The
             -o  option  is required with this option. See "Pars-
             able Output Format", below.

         -o field[,...], --output field[,...]
             A case-insensitive, comma-separated list  of  output
             fields to display. The field name must be one of the
             fields listed below, or the  special  value  all  to
             display  all fields. For each interface, the follow-
             ing fields can be displayed:

             ADDROBJ
                 The name of the address object.


             TYPE
                 Type of the address object. It will be  one  of:
                 from-gz,  static, dhcp, or addrconf. The static,
                 dhcp, and addrconf types correspond to the  type
                 of the address object specified by the -T option
                 of create-addr. The from-gz type  will  only  be
                 displayed  in  non-global  zones,  and indicates
                 that the address was  configured  based  on  the
                 allowed-address   property  configured  for  the
                 non-global exclusive-IP  zone  from  the  global
                 zone.


             STATE
                 State of the address object. This field is shown
                 only  when  all is specified with -o. This indi-
                 cates one of the following values:

                 disabled
                     Address is not part of the active configura-
                     tion (see disable-addr and disable-if).


                 down
                     Address is administratively down (see  down-
                     addr).


                 duplicate
                     Address was found to conflict  with  another
                     system's  IP  address  by  duplicate address
                     detection (DAD) and cannot be used until the
                     conflict   is   resolved.  The  system  will
                     periodically rerun DAD to determine  if  the
                     conflict  has  been resolved. Alternatively,
                     refresh-addr  can  be  used  to  immediately
                     rerun DAD.

                 inaccessible
                     Address cannot be used because the IP inter-
                     face it is configured on has failed.


                 ok
                     Address  is  enabled,  up,  and  functioning
                     properly.  The system will accept IP packets
                     destined to this address, and will originate
                     IP  packets  with this address in accordance
                     with the configured IP source address selec-
                     tion policy.


                 tentative
                     Address is  currently  undergoing  duplicate
                     address  detection  (for example, as part of
                     up-addr or refresh-addr).



             CURRENT
                 For address objects in active configuration,  it
                 indicates any of the following flags. This field
                 is not shown by default and will be  shown  only
                 when all or current is specified with -o.

                 D (dhcp)
                     Address was aquired through DHCP


                 d (deprecated)
                     Will not be used as source address for  out-
                     bound  packets  unless  either  there are no
                     other addresses available on  the  interface
                     or  the  application has explicitly bound to
                     this address.


                 p (private)
                     Address not advertised by the  routing  dae-
                     mon.


                 S (stateless)
                     Address was configured through  IPv6  state-
                     less autoconfiguration.

                 t (temporary)
                     Temporary IPv6 address  as  defined  in  RFC
                     3041.


                 U (up)
                     Address  is  marked  up   for   use   as   a
                     source/destination of outbound/inbound pack-
                     ets.


                 u (unnumbered)
                     Address matches the local  address  of  some
                     other link in the system.



             PERSISTENT
                 Specifies the configuration that will be applied
                 when  the  address  object  is  instantiated  on
                 reboot or re-enabled using the enable-addr  sub-
                 command.  It  can  be  any or all of U, p, and d
                 (see above).


             ADDR
                 Numeric IPv4 or IPv6 address.  In  the  case  of
                 point-to-  point  interfaces,  the  addresses of
                 both  the  endpoints,  are  displayed   (laddr--
                 >raddr).  For an address object of type dhcp, if
                 the state of the address object is disabled,  or
                 if  the  address  is  0.0.0.0 for IPv4 or :: for
                 IPv6, then a question mark (?) is displayed.


             CID-TYPE
                 The  type  of  the  Client  ID   used   by   the
                 dhcpagent(1M),  if the address is being obtained
                 using DHCP. For IPv4, this shows the type of the
                 DUID  used  in  constructing the RFC 4361 Client
                 ID. The type is one of DUID-LLT, DUID-EN,  DUID-
                 LL,  other,  or default. This field is not shown
                 in the default output. It can be shown using  -d
                 or using cid-type or all with -o.

                 DUID-LLT
                     Type 1 RFC 3315 DUID is used in constructing
                     CID-VALUE            (for         example,
                     1,1,63463777,0a:0b:0c:0d:0e:0f).  Refer   to
                     the RFC for more details.


                 DUID-EN
                     Type 2 RFC 3315 DUID is used in constructing
                     CID-VALUE            (for         example,
                     1,1,63463777,0a:0b:0c:0d:0e:0f).  Refer   to
                     the RFC for more details.


                 DUID-LL
                     Type 3 RFC 3315 DUID is used in constructing
                     CID-VALUE            (for         example,
                     1,1,63463777,0a:0b:0c:0d:0e:0f).  Refer   to
                     the RFC for more details.


                 other
                     An RFC 3315 DUID of a Type in {0,4-65535} is
                     used  to  derive the Client ID (for example,
                     4,0x734633) or the CID-VALUE is a raw Client
                     ID  (for  example,  Sun, 0xab3146) that does
                     not conform to RFC 3315.


                 default
                     Indicates that the  RFC  3315  DUID  is  not
                     being  used  to  construct  the  Client  ID.
                     Instead, Client ID is derived using the  MAC
                     address  of  the  interface as per RFC 2132.
                     CID-VALUE will contain the string 0x01  fol-
                     lowed by the MAC address hex string. This is
                     applicable only for IPv4.



             CID-VALUE
                 Value   of   the   Client   ID   used   by   the
                 dhcpagent(1M),  if the address is being obtained
                 using DHCP. Format used follows that of the con-
                 figuration    parameter    CLIENT_ID   in   file
                 /etc/default/dhcpagent. Refer to the description
                 of CLIENT_ID in dhcpagent(1M). When the CID-TYPE
                 is default, the CID-VALUE  contains  the  legacy
                 CLIENT-ID,  constructed  as  per  RFC 2132. This
                 field is not shown in the default output. It can
                 be  shown using -d or using cid-type or all with
                 -o.

             BEGIN
                 The time at which the lease  began,  if  one  is
                 available,  for  the  addresses  obtained  using
                 DHCP. The time is displayed in the  format  dic-
                 tated  by  the  LC_TIME locale environment vari-
                 able. For addresses not configured using DHCP or
                 for DHCP addresses that do not have a lease yet,
                 -- (two hyphens) will be displayed.  This  field
                 is  not  shown  in the default output. It can be
                 shown using -d or using cid-type or all with -o.


             EXPIRE
                 The time at which the lease expires, if  one  is
                 available,  for  the  addresses  obtained  using
                 DHCP. The time is displayed in the  format  dic-
                 tated  by  the  LC_TIME locale environment vari-
                 able. For addresses not configured using DHCP or
                 for DHCP addresses that do not have a lease yet,
                 -- (two hyphens) will be displayed.  This  field
                 is  not  shown  in the default output. It can be
                 shown using -d or using cid-type or all with -o.


             RENEW
                 The time at which the lease was last renewed for
                 the  addresses  obtained using DHCP. The time is
                 displayed in the format dictated by the  LC_TIME
                 locale  environment  variable. For addresses not
                 configured using DHCP or for DHCP addresses that
                 do  not  have a lease yet, -- (two hyphens) will
                 be displayed. This field is  not  shown  in  the
                 default  output.  It  can  be  shown using -d or
                 using cid-type or all with -o.


             VRRP-ROUTER
                 The name of the VRRP router that  is  associated
                 with the vrrp type IP addresses, if it is known.
                 Note that for a vrrp type IP  address  of  a  L2
                 type  VRRP  router,  as  the  VRRP router can be
                 later derived from the VNIC that the IP  address
                 resides  on, it is possible that the VRRP router
                 does not exist yet. A question mark (?) will  be
                 shown  in  that  case. For IP addresses of other
                 types other than vrrp  type,  the  "VRRP-ROUTER"
                 field  does  not  apply and a double hyphen (--)
                 will be shown.

         -d, --dhcp
             Display  the  dhcp  status  fields   for   addresses
             acquired   using  DHCP.  The  fields  displayed  are
             ADDROBJ, STATE, ADDR,  CID-TYPE,  CID-VALUE,  BEGIN,
             EXPIRE,  and  RENEW.  This  option displays only the
             human-readable output and cannot be used in conjunc-
             tion with -p.


         Note -

           In some cases you will see addresses that have a ques-
           tion  mark  (?) in the address object name. This means
           that those addresses were created  outside  the  ipadm
           library and therefore not known to ipadm.


     down-addr [-t] addrobj
         The address identified by addrobj  is  marked  down,  so
         that  it  cannot  be  used  as  a  source/destination of
         outbound/inbound packets. This command has no effect  if
         the  address object was already marked down prior to the
         down-addr invocation. If the address object is  of  type
         addrconf, the command returns an error.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the configured address  is  temporary
             and  changes apply only to the active configuration.
             This option is mandatory if the address object  type
             is dhcp.



     up-addr [-t] addrobj
         The address identified by addrobj is marked up, so  that
         it    can   be   used   as   a   source/destination   of
         outbound/inbound packets. This subcommand has no  effect
         if the address object has been marked down by the system
         because it is a duplicate address, or if the address was
         marked  up  prior  to  the  up-addr  invocation.  If the
         address object is of type addrconf, the command  returns
         an error.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the configured address  is  temporary
             and  changes apply only to the active configuration.
             This option is mandatory if the address object  type
             is dhcp.

     refresh-addr [-i] addrobj
         If the addrobj is of the type static then DAD (Duplicate
         Address  Detection)  will be restarted (if necessary) on
         the address identified by the address object.

         If the addrobj is of the type dhcp, then the lease dura-
         tion  obtained  on  the  address will be extended by the
         DHCP client daemon.

         If the addrobj is of the type addrconf then the  command
         returns an error.

         -i, --inform
             For a specified IP address, obtains  network  confi-
             guration  parameters  from  DHCP without obtaining a
             lease on it. This is useful in situations  where  an
             IP address is obtained through mechanisms other than
             DHCP.



     disable-addr -t addrobj
         Disables the address by removing it from the active con-
         figuration. If the address object was originally created
         persistently,  then  the  persistent  configuration   is
         unchanged.  To  re-enable  this  addrobj, one should use
         enable-addr.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies  that  the  disabling  is  temporary   and
             changes apply only to the active configuration.



     enable-addr -t addrobj
         Enables the given addrobj by reading  the  configuration
         from  the  persistent  store. All the persistent address
         properties are applied to the address object. This  sub-
         command requires that the interface on which the address
         object is being enabled be  present.  If  the  interface
         itself is missing in active configuration and is present
         in persistent store, that is, if the interface  is  dis-
         abled,  then the user has to run enable-if before invok-
         ing enable-addr.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the enabling is temporary and changes
             apply only to the active configuration.

     set-addrprop [-t] -p prop=value[,...] addrobj
         Sets the value of a property on the  addrobj  specified.
         If  the addrobj maps to several addresses, then property
         changes applies to all the addresses referenced  by  the
         addrobj.  Only  one property can be specified at a time.
         The  properties  supported  on  the  addrobj   and   the
         property's  possible values can be retrieved using show-
         addrprop subcommand. If the addrobj is of type addrconf,
         the command returns an error.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the changes are temporary and changes
             apply only to the active configuration.


         -p prop=value[,...], --prop prop=value[,...]
             A property to set to the specified values.



     reset-addrprop [-t] -p prop addrobj
         Resets the given address property to its default  value.
         If  -t is not used, any persistent value of the property
         will be deleted. Only one property can be modified at  a
         time.  If  the  addrobj is of type addrconf, the command
         returns an error.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the resets are temporary and  changes
             apply only to the active configuration.


         -p prop, --prop prop
             A property to be reset.



     show-addrprop [[-c] -o field[,...]] [-p prop,...] [addrobj]
         Show the current and persistent values of  one  or  more
         properties,   either  for  all  the  configured  address
         objects or for the specified addrobj. Several properties
         of  interest  can  be retrieved at one time by providing
         comma-separated property names to -p option. If  the  -p
         option  is  not  specified, all available properties are
         displayed. If the addrobj is of type addrconf, the  com-
         mand returns an error.
         -o field[,...], --output field[,...]
             A case-insensitive, comma-separated list  of  output
             fields to display. The field name must be one of the
             fields listed below, or the  special  value  all  to
             display  all fields. For each addrobj, the following
             fields can be displayed:

             ADDROBJ
                 The name of the address object.


             PROPERTY
                 The name of the property.


             PERM
                 The read/write permissions of the property.  The
                 value  shown  will  be  r  (read only), w (write
                 only) or rw (read/write).


             CURRENT
                 The current value of the property. For the  dis-
                 abled  addresses,  because the value is not set,
                 the value displays as a double hyphen (--).


             PERSISTENT
                 The persistent value of a  property.  Persistent
                 values  are the values that will be reapplied on
                 reboot.


             DEFAULT
                 The default value of the property. If  the  pro-
                 perty  has  no default value, double hyphen (--)
                 is shown.


             POSSIBLE
                 A comma-separated list of the values a  property
                 can  have.  If  the values span a numeric range,
                 min - max might be shown as  shorthand.  If  the
                 possible values are unknown, a question mark (?)
                 is displayed or if they  are  unbounded,  double
                 hyphen (--) will be shown.

         -c, --parsable
             Display using a stable machine-parsable format.  The
             -o  option  is required with this option. See "Pars-
             able Output Format", below.


         -p prop,..., --prop=prop
             A comma-separated list of properties to display. See
             the  sections on address object properties following
             subcommand descriptions.



     set-prop [-t] -p prop[+ | -]=value[,...] protocol
         Modifies the value of a protocol property to  the  value
         specified.  If  the  property takes multiple values, the
         values should be specified with a comma  as  the  delim-
         iter.  Only  one property can be specified at a time. By
         default, the value is persistent and will  be  reapplied
         on  reboot.  The  properties supported on a protocol and
         the property's possible values can  be  retrieved  using
         the show-prop subcommand

         The following protocols are supported: ip,  ipv4,  ipv6,
         icmp, tcp, udp and sctp.

         Note that for some properties, it might be  possible  to
         set  the  value  of the property both globally, and on a
         per-interface basis. The per-interface value can be  set
         using  the  set-ifprop subcommand. In such cases, if the
         administrator chooses  to  customize  the  per-interface
         value  of  the  property  to be distinct from the global
         value, the per-interface value overrides the global set-
         ting for that interface.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the changes to  properties  are  tem-
             porary  and  changes apply only to the active confi-
             guration.


         -p prop[+|-]=value[,...], --prop prop[+|-]=value[,...]
             A property to set to the specified values.  It  also
             provides  the  following "qualifiers" to perform add
             and delete operations in addition to assignment.

             +
                 Adds the given value  to  the  current  list  of
                 value(s).

             -
                 Removes the given value from the current list of
                 value(s).


             =
                 Makes a  new  assignment  and  removes  all  the
                 current value(s).

             See EXAMPLES for more information on how to use  the
             qualifiers.



     reset-prop [-t] -p prop protocol
         Resets a property  of  the  specified  protocol  to  the
         default  value  of  the property. If -t is not used, any
         persistent value of the property will be  deleted.  Only
         one property can be modified at a time.

         -t, --temporary
             Specifies that the resets are temporary and  changes
             apply only to the active configuration.


         -p prop, --prop prop
             A property to be reset.



    show-prop [[-c] -o field[,...]] [-p prop[,...] protocol
     protocol]
         Show the current and persistent values of  one  or  more
         properties,  either  for  all supported protocols or for
         the specified protocol. Several properties  of  interest
         can  be retrieved at a time by providing comma-separated
         property names to -p option. If the  -p  option  is  not
         specified, all available properties are displayed.

         -o field[,...], --output field[,...]
             A case-insensitive, comma-separated list  of  output
             fields to display. The field name must be one of the
             fields listed below, or the  special  value  all  to
             display all fields. For each protocol, the following
             fields can be displayed:

             PROTO
                 The name of the protocol.

             PROPERTY
                 The name of the property.


             PERM
                 The read/write permissions of the property.  The
                 value  shown  will  be  r  (read only), w (write
                 only) or rw (read/write).


             CURRENT
                 The current value of the property. For the  dis-
                 abled  addresses,  because the value is not set,
                 the value displays as a double hyphen  (--).  If
                 the value is unknown, it is displayed as a ques-
                 tion mark (?). If the current value of the  pro-
                 perty  is  not  in  the  set  of listed POSSIBLE
                 values, the keyword custom is displayed.


             PERSISTENT
                 The persistent value of a  property.  Persistent
                 values  are the values that will be reapplied on
                 reboot.


             DEFAULT
                 The default value of the property. If  the  pro-
                 perty  has  no default value, double hyphen (--)
                 is shown.


             POSSIBLE
                 A comma-separated list of  the  values  for  the
                 property  setting  to  be used with the set-prop
                 subcommand. If the values span a numeric  range,
                 min  -  max  might be shown as shorthand. If the
                 possible values are unknown, a question mark (?)
                 is  displayed  or  if they are unbounded, double
                 hyphen (--) will be shown.



         -c, --parsable
             Display using a stable machine-parsable format.  The
             -o  option  is required with this option. See "Pars-
             able Output Format", below.

         -p prop,..., --prop=prop
             A comma-separated list of properties to display. See
             the  sections  on protocol properties following sub-
             command descriptions.

         For the supported list of properties for every protocol,
         see "Protocol Properties" below.


     help [subcommand-name]
         Displays all of the supported ipadm subcommands or usage
         for  a  given  subcommand.  If  you  display  help for a
         specific subcommand, the command  syntax  is  displayed,
         along  with  an  example.  Using  ipadm help without any
         argument displays all of the subcommands.


  Parseable Output Format
     The ipadm "show" subcommands have an -o option that displays
     output  in  a  machine-parsable format. The output format is
     one or more lines of colon (:) delimited fields. The  fields
     displayed are specific to the subcommand used and are listed
     under the entry for the -o option for  a  given  subcommand.
     Output  includes only those fields requested by means of the
     -o option, in the order requested.  Note  that  the  -o  all
     option,  which  displays  all the fields for a given subcom-
     mand, cannot be used with parsable output option.


     When you request multiple fields, any literal colon  charac-
     ters  are  escaped  by  a backslash (\) before being output.
     Similarly, literal backslash  characters  are  also  escaped
     (\\).  This escape format is parsable by using shell read(1)
     functions with the environment variable set  as  IFS=:  Note
     that  escaping  is  not  done when you request only a single
     field.

  Protocol Properties
     The following protocol properties are supported:

     Note -

       There are protocol properties,  specific  to  a  protocol,
       that  begin with "_" (underbar). These properties are sub-
       ject  to  change  or  removal  and  by  default,  are  not
       displayed  in  ipadm  show-prop output. See Oracle Solaris
       Tunable Parameters Reference Manual for details.

     arp_publish_count (IP)
         This option defines how many gratuitous ARP messages are
         sent to announce local addresses.

     arp_publish_interval (IP)
         This option defines the interval between gratuitous  ARP
         messages which are sent to announce local addresses.


     cong_default (TCP, SCTP)
         Specify the default congestion control algorithm used by
         the  protocol when new connections are created. Applica-
         tions can opt to choose a different algorithm at a later
         point  in the connnection's lifetime. Only enabled algo-
         rithms can be set as default (see cong_enabled).


     cong_enabled (TCP, SCTP)
         This option can be used to enable or disable  congestion
         control algorithms. By default, all algorithms installed
         on the systems are enabled. Disabled  algorithms  cannot
         be set as default (see cong_default) or used by applica-
         tions.

         Algorithms can be added or removed  using  the  set-prop
         subcommand and the modifiers + and -.


     ecn (TCP)
         Explicit Congestion  Control  (see  RFC  3168  for  more
         information).  Possible  values  are  the same as above:
         never, passive, and active.


     extra_priv_ports (TCP, SCTP, UDP)
         This option define additional privileged  ports  outside
         of  the  1-1023 range. Any program that attempts to bind
         the ports listed here must run as  root.  This  prevents
         normal  users from starting server processes on specific
         ports.

         These ports can be added, removed, or assigned using the
         set-prop  subcommand  and the modifiers +, -, and =. See
         EXAMPLES below on usage.


     forwarding (IPv4), forwarding (IPv6)
         Enable/disable global IPv4 or IPv6 forwarding.  All  the
         configured  interfaces  will start/stop forwarding pack-
         ets.  Individual  interfaces  can  override  the  global
         option using set-ifprop.

     hostmodel (IPv4), hostmodel (IPv6)
         Control  send/receive  behavior  for  IP  packets  on  a
         multi-homed system. The value of hostmodel can be set to
         strong or weak, corresponding  to  the  equivalent  end-
         system  model  definitions  of  RFC 1122. In addition, a
         third value of src-priority is also  supported.  In  the
         src-priority   hostmodel  scenario,  a  packet  will  be
         accepted on any interface, as long as the packet's  des-
         tination  IP  address is configured and marked UP on one
         of the host's interfaces. When transmitting a packet, if
         multiple routes for the IP destination in the packet are
         available, the system will prefer routes  where  the  IP
         source address in the packet is configured on the outgo-
         ing interface. If no such route is available, the system
         will  fall  back  to selecting the "best" route, as with
         the weak ES case.


     max_buf (TCP, SCTP, UDP, ICMP)
         Maximum size of the send or receive socket  buffer.  The
         current  value of this property limits the maximum value
         of recv_buf and send_buf.


     ndp_unsolicit_count (IP)
         This option defines how many NDP advertisement  messages
         are sent to announce local IPv6 addresses.


     ndp_unsolicit_interval (IP)
         This option defines the interval between NDP  advertise-
         ment  messages  which  are  sent  to announce local IPv6
         addresses.


     recv_buf (TCP, SCTP, UDP, ICMP)
     send_buf (TCP, SCTP, UDP, ICMP)
         Modifies the receive or send buffer sizes for the speci-
         fied  protocol. The maximum value of these properties is
         bound by the current value of the max_buf property.


     sack (TCP)
         Selective acknowledgment  (SACK)  allows  recipients  to
         selectively  acknowledge  out-of-sequence  data  and  is
         intended to increase performance for data transfers over
         lossy  links.  See RFC 2018 for information on the SACK.
         Possible values and meanings:
         never
             Will neither accept SACK nor send out SACK  informa-
             tion.


         passive
             Will accept SACK but not send out.


         active
             Will both accept SACK and send out SACK information.



     smallest_anon_port (TCP, SCTP, UDP)
     largest_anon_port (TCP, SCTP, UDP)
         These options define  the  upper  and  lower  bounds  on
         ephemeral ports. Ephemeral (means short-lived) ports are
         used when  establishing  outbound  network  connections.
         Note  that  the  current value of the smallest_anon_port
         should be always less than or equal to the current value
         of largest_anon_port.


     smallest_nonpriv_port (TCP, SCTP, UDP)
         This option define the start  of  non-privileged  ports.
         The  non-privileged  port range normally starts at 1024.
         Any program that attempts to bind a non-privileged  port
         does not have to run as root.


     send_redirects (IPv4), send_redirects (IPv6)
         This option controls whether  IPv4  or  IPv6  sends  out
         ICMPv4 or ICMPv6 redirect messages.


     ttl (IPv4), hoplimit (IPv6)
         Specifies the value that will be  set  for  ttl/hoplimit
         field  of an IPv4 or IPv6 header. Can be used to prevent
         the system from reaching other systems more than N  hops
         away  where N was the value specified. See ipsec(7P) for
         IPsec related IP protocol properties.


  Interface Properties
     The following interface properties are supported:
     arp
         Enables/disables the use of the Address Resolution  Pro-
         tocol  (ARP)  on  an  interface.  ARP is used in mapping
         between  network  level   addresses   and   link   level
         addresses.  This  is  currently  implemented for mapping
         between  IPv4  addresses  and  MAC  addresses.  Possible
         values are on or off. Default is on.


     exchange_routes
         Enables/disables exchanging of  routing  information  on
         this  interface.  Possible values are on or off. Default
         is off.


     group
         Specifies the group name of the IPMP interface for which
         this interface is an underlying interface. If the inter-
         face is of class IPMP, this specifies the  name  of  the
         IPMP  group.  It  is  a read-write property only on IPMP
         interfaces. For other interface classes,  this  property
         is read-only.


     forwarding
         Enables/disables IP forwarding  on  an  interface.  When
         enabled, the IP packets can be forwarded to and from the
         interface. Possible values are on  or  off.  Default  is
         off.


     metric
         Set the routing metric of the  interface  to  n;  if  no
         value is specified, the default is 0. The routing metric
         is used by the routing protocol. Higher metrics have the
         effect  of  making  a  route less favorable. Metrics are
         counted as additional hops to the destination network or
         host.


     mtu
         Set the maximum transmission unit of the interface to n.
         For  many types of networks, the MTU has an upper limit,
         for example, 1500 for Ethernet.


     nud
         Enables/disables the neighbor  unreachability  detection
         mechanism   on   a  point-to-point  physical  interface.

         Possible values are on or off. Default is on.


     standby
         Specifies whether  the  interface  is  configured  as  a
         standby  interface  for  an IPMP group. This property is
         not applicable to IPMP interfaces.


     usesrc
         Specifies a physical or virtual interface to be used for
         source  address  selection. If the keyword none is used,
         then any previous  selection  is  cleared.   Default  is
         none.

         Note that source address  selection  using  the  -setsrc
         option  to  route(1M) takes precedence over usesrc based
         source address selection. In other words source  address
         selection  is  done  for  routes  before  it is done for
         interfaces, as the former is more fine-grained.


  Address Properties
     The address properties listed below are supported. Note that
     modifying address properties for addrconf address objects is
     not supported.

     deprecated
         The address should no longer used as a source address in
         new   communications,  but  packets  addressed  to  this
         address are processed as expected. Possible  values  are
         on  or  off.  Default  is off. This property is not sup-
         ported on an address object of type dhcp.


     prefixlen
         Specifies the number of left-most contiguous bits of the
         address that comprise the IPv6 prefix or IPv4 netmask of
         the address. The remaining  low-order  bits  define  the
         host part of the address. When prefixlen is converted to
         a text representation of the address, the  address  con-
         tain  1's  for the bit positions that are to be used for
         the network part, and 0's for the host part. The prefix-
         len  must  be specified as a single decimal number. This
         property is not supported on an address object  of  type
         dhcp.


     private
         Specifies that the addresses should not be advertised by
         the  in.routed routing daemon. Possible values are on or
         off. Default is off.


     reqhost
         The hostname to which the client  would  like  the  DHCP
         server  to  map  the  client's  leased  IPv4. A hostname
         request is not guaranteed to be fulfilled.


     transmit
         Enables packets to be transmitted  using  the  addresses
         referenced  by  the  address object. This is the default
         behavior when the address is up. Possible values are  on
         or off. Default is on.


     zone
         This option might be removed in a future release.

         Specifies the zone in which all the addresses referenced
         by  the  address object should be placed. The named zone
         must be active in the kernel in  the  ready  or  running
         state.  The  interface  is  unplumbed  when  the zone is
         halted or rebooted. The zone must be configured to be an
         shared-IP  zone.  zonecfg(1M)  is used to assign network
         interface names to exclusive-IP  zones.  To  modify  the
         zone  assignment  such  that it persists across reboots,
         please use zonecfg(1M). Possible values are the list  of
         all  the zones configured on the system. Default is glo-
         bal.

Operands
     Each ipadm subcommand  operates  on  one  of  the  following
     objects:

     addrobj
         An address configured on a network interface is  identi-
         fied  by  an  addrobj. An addrobj consists of two parts.
         The first part is the name of the network  interface  on
         which  the  address  is configured. The second part is a
         user-specified  string  that  can   use   any   of   the
         alphanumeric characters and dash `-', and it can be max-
         imum 32 characters in  length  and  must  begin  with  a
         letter.  The  dash  is reserved for system use, in which
         case the name preceding it identifies  the  system  com-
         ponent that created it. The two parts of the addrobj are
         delimited by a  slash  (/).  An  address  object  always
         represents a unique set of addresses in a system.

         Note -

           It is possible, though not optimal, to  use  ipadm  to
           further manage system created addrobj type.


     interface
         Name of the network interface on which  network  address
         is   configured.  In  general,  the  name  can  use  any
         alphanumeric characters, plus the underscore (_) and the
         period  (.), but must start with an alphabetic character
         and end with a number.


     protocol
         Name of the TCP/IP Internet protocol family for which  a
         property  is  to  be configured. Following protocols are
         supported: ip, ipv4, ipv6, icmp, tcp, sctp and udp.

Examples
     Example 1 Using ipadm with No Arguments


     The following command displays a concise view of the  inter-
     face and address configuration on a system.


       # ipadm
       NAME             CLASS/TYPE STATE     UNDER   ADDR
       ipmp0            ipmp       degraded  --      --
         ipmp0/v6       static     ok        --      2001:db8:1:2::4c08/128
       lo0              loopback   ok        --      --
         lo0/v4         static     ok        --      127.0.0.1/8
         lo0/v6         static     ok        --      ::1/128
       net0             ip         ok        --     --
         net0/dhcp      dhcp       ok        --      10.132.146.234/23
         net0/v4        static     ok        --      10.132.146.233/23
       net1             ip         failed    ipmp0   --
         net1/aconf     addrconf   ok        --      fe80::214:4fff:fe58:1831/10
       net2             ip         ok        ipmp0   --
         net2/aconf     addrconf   ok        --      fe80::214:4fff:fe58:1832/10



     Example 2 Creating IPv4 Static Addresses


     The following command creates  the  address  10.2.3.4/24  on
     interface bge1 (linkname net1) and marks the address up, for
     use.

       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=10.2.3.4/24 net1/v4static1




     Alternatively automatic address object name  generation  can
     be  used. The automatically generated name will be displayed
     to the console and can be used in any future ipadm  commands
     requiring an address object name.


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=10.2.3.4/24 net1
       net1/v4




     The following command creates another address 10.2.3.5/24 on
     interface  net1  but marks the address down until explicitly
     marked up.


       # ipadm create-addr -T static -d -a 10.2.3.5/24 net1
       net1/v4




     Note that 10.2.3.5/24 is assumed to be  the  local  address,
     because local was not used and there was only one address.



     The following command marks the address object  net1/v4a  up
     that was previously marked down.


       # ipadm up-addr net1/v4a




     If the DUPLICATE flag was set on the  address  object,  then
     refresh-addr  will verify that the address is still a dupli-
     cate on the network. If it  is  not,  the  address  will  be
     marked up.


       # ipadm refresh-addr net1/v4a

     The following command lists the addresses that were  config-
     ured.  This  shows that the address net1/v4a is not a dupli-
     cate.


       # ipadm show-addr
       ADDROBJ          TYPE    STATE      ADDR
       lo0/v4           static  ok         127.0.0.1/8
       lo0/v6           static  ok         ::/128
       net1/v4          static  ok         10.2.3.4/24
       net1/v4a         static  ok         10.2.3.10/24



     Example 3 Creating DHCPv4-controlled Addresses


     The following command obtains a DHCPv4 address on  interface
     bge1 (linkname net1).


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T dhcp net1/dhaddr
       # ipadm show-addr net1/dhaddr
       ADDROBJ          TYPE    STATE      ADDR
       net1/dhaddr      dhcp    ok         10.8.48.173/25




     The following command extends the  lease  duration  for  the
     DHCPv4 address object net1/dhaddr.


       # ipadm refresh-addr net1/dhaddr



     Example 4 Creating IPv6 Addresses


     The following  sequence  of  commands  auto-configures  IPv6
     addresses  on  bge1  (linkname  net1) using in.ndpd with the
     default interface ID. A  link-local  address  is  configured
     first, followed by in.ndpd adding the stateless and stateful
     auto-configured addresses.


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T addrconf net1/v6addr

     The following command creates a IPv6 static address.  To  be
     able  to  configure an IPv6 address that is not a link-local
     address, the interface  should  already  have  a  link-local
     address  configured on it. It was accomplished by the previ-
     ous step with -T addrconf.


       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=2ff0::f3ad/64 net1/v6static




     The following command changes the prefix length of  an  IPv6
     address.


       # ipadm set-addrprop -p prefixlen=80 net1/v6static




     All the auto-configured addresses  and  the  updated  prefix
     length can be viewed by listing the addresses:


       # ipadm show-addr
       ADDROBJ       TYPE     STATE     ADDR
       lo0/v4        static   ok        127.0.0.1/8
       lo0/v6        static   ok        ::/128
       net1/v6addr   addrconf ok        fe80::203:baff:fe94:2f01/10
       net1/v6addr   addrconf ok        2002:a08:39f0:1:203:baff:\
                                          fe94:2f00/64
       net1/v6addr   addrconf ok        2001:db8:1:2::402f/128
       net1/v6static static   ok        2ff0::f3ad/80



     Example 5 Creating VRRP Addresses


     The  following  command  creates  the  IPv4   vrrp   address
     10.2.3.4/24 on the VRRP VNIC interface vrrpV4_vnic1.


       # ipadm create-ip vrrpV4_vnic1
       # ipadm create-addr -T vrrp -a local=10.2.3.4/24 vrrpV4_vnic1/v4vrrp1




     The following command first creates a IPv6  link-local  vrrp
     address  then creates the IPv6 vrrp address 2ff0::f3ad/80 on
     the VRRP VNIC interface vrrpV6_vnic1:


       # ipadm create-ip vrrpV6_vnic1
       # ipadm create-addr -T vrrp vrrpV6_vnic1/v6vrrp1
       # ipadm create-addr -T vrrp -a local=2ff0::f3ad/80 vrrpV6_vnic1/v6vrrp2




     Note  that  the  above  vrrp  addresses  are  VRRP   virtual
     addresses  for  the  l2 type VRRP routers, so no router name
     needs to be specified. On the another hand, the router  name
     must  be specified by the `-n' option for the vrrp addresses
     configured for l3 type VRRP routers:



     The  following  command  creates  the  IPv4   vrrp   address
     10.2.3.5/24   on   the   interface   net1  for  VRRP  router
     vrrpV4_router1.


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T vrrp -a local=10.2.3.5/24 -n vrrpV4_router1 net1/v4vrrp1




     The following command first creates a IPv6  link-local  vrrp
     address  then creates the IPv6 vrrp address 2ff0::f3ad/80 on
     the interface net1 for VRRP router vrrpV6_router1.


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T vrrp -n vrrpV6_router1 net1/v6vrrp1
       # ipadm create-addr -T vrrp -a local=2ff0::f3ae/80 -n vrrpV6_router1 net1/v6vrrp2




     The following command lists the addresses that were  config-
     ured.


       # ipadm show-addr

       ADDROBJ        TYPE STATE        ADDR
       lo0/v4         static    ok      127.0.0.1/8
       lo0/v6         static    ok      ::/128
       vrrpV4_vnic1/v4vrrp1 vrrp ok      10.2.3.4/24
       net1/v4vrrp1   vrrp ok      10.2.3.5/24
       vrrpV6_vnic1/v6vrrp1 vrrp ok     fe80::200:5eff:fe00:20c/10
       vrrpV6_vnic1/v6vrrp2 vrrp ok     2ff0::f3ad/80
       net1/v4vrrp1   vrrp ok      fe80::200:5eff:fe00:20e/10
       net1/v6vrrp2   vrrp ok      2ff0::f3ae/80



     Example 6 Configuring an IPv4 Tunnel


     The first command below (ipadm) creates  the  tunnel  source
     address.  Then, a dladm command creates the tunnel link. The
     final ipadm commands configure the IPv4 and  IPv6  addresses
     on the tunnel IP interface.


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=10.2.3.4/24 net1/v4static
       # dladm create-iptun -T ipv4 -a local=10.2.3.4,remote=10.2.3.5 tun0
       # ipadm create-ip tun0
       # ipadm create-addr -T static \
              -a local=173.129.134.1,remote=173.129.134.2 tun0/v4tunaddr
       # ipadm create-addr -T static \
              -a local=2ff1::3344,remote=2ff1::3345 tun0/v6tunaddr
       # ipadm show-addr
       ADDROBJ        TYPE   STATE     ADDR
       lo0/v4         static ok        127.0.0.1/8
       lo0/v6         static ok        ::/128
       net1/v4static  static ok        10.2.3.4/24
       tun0/v4tunaddr static ok        173.129.134.1-->173.129.134.2
       tun0/v6tunaddr static ok        2ff1::3344-->2ff1::3345



     Example 7 Viewing All of the Interfaces


     The following command enables you to view all interfaces.


       # ipadm show-if -o all
       IFNAME  CLASS    STATE    ACTIVE CURRENT       PERSISTENT OVER
       lo0     loopback ok       yes    -m-v------46  --46       --
       net0    ip       ok       yes    bm--------46  --46       --
       e1000g0 ip       ok       yes    bm---l----46  -l46       --
       e1000g1 ip       ok       yes    bm---l----46  -l46       --
       ipmp0   ipmp     down     yes    bm--------46  --46       e1000g0 e1000g1
       tun0    ip       failed   no     -mp-------46  --46       --
       vni0    vni      disabled no     bm-v--------  --46       --

     Example 8 Displaying Interface Properties


     The following command displays all interface properties  for
     a specified interface.


       # ipadm show-ifprop net0
       IFNAME PROPERTY        PROTO PERM CURRENT PERSISTENT DEFAULT  POSSIBLE
       net0   arp             ipv4  rw   on      --        on       on,off
       net0   forwarding      ipv4  rw   off     on         off      on,off
       net0   metric          ipv4  rw   2       2          0        --
       net0   mtu             ipv4  rw   1500    --         1500     68-1500
       net0   exchange_routes ipv4  rw   off     --         off      on,off
       net0   usesrc          ipv4  rw   none    --         none    --
       net0   forwarding      ipv6  rw   off     --         off      on,off
       net0   metric          ipv6  rw   2       2          0        --
       net0   mtu             ipv6  rw   1500    --         1500     1280-1500
       net0   nud             ipv6  rw   on      --        on       on,off
       net0   exchange_routes ipv6  rw   off     on         off      on,off
       net0   usesrc          ipv6  rw   none    --         none    --
       net0   group           ip    rw   grp0    --         --       --
       net0   standby         ip    r-   off     --         off      on,off



     Example 9 Configuring per-Interface Properties


     The following command sets the IPv4  MTU  of  the  interface
     net0 to 900.


       # ipadm set-ifprop -m ipv4 -p mtu=900 net0




     The following command sets the IPv6  MTU  of  the  interface
     net0 to 1400.


       # ipadm set-ifprop -m ipv6 -p mtu 1400 net0




     View the results:


       # ipadm show-ifprop -p mtu net0
       IFNAME PROPERTY        PROTO PERM CURRENT PERSISTENT DEFAULT  POSSIBLE

       net0   mtu             ipv4  rw   900     900        1500     68-1500
       net0   mtu             ipv6  rw   1400    1400       1500   1280-1500

       # ipadm show-ifprop -m ipv6 -p mtu net0
       IFNAME PROPERTY        PROTO PERM CURRENT PERSISTENT DEFAULT  POSSIBLE
       net0   mtu             ipv6  rw   1400    1400       1500   1280-1500



     Example 10 Displaying Supported Properties


     The following command displays the properties  supported  on
     TCP.


       # ipadm show-prop tcp
       PROTO PROPERTY              PERM CURRENT PERSISTENT DEFAULT   POSSIBLE
       tcp   ecn                   rw   active  active     passive   never,passive,
                                          active
       tcp   extra_priv_ports      rw   --      1,65535    2049,4045 1-65535
       tcp   largest_anon_port     rw   32768   32768      65535     1024-65535
       tcp   sack                  rw   active  --         active    never,passive,
                                          active
       tcp   recv_buf              rw   29567   --         49152   2048-1073741824
       tcp   send_buf              rw   21354   --         49152   4096-1073741824
       tcp   max_buf               ro   65536   --         32768     4096-1073741824
       tcp   smallest_anon_port    rw   32768   --         32768     1024-65535
       tcp   smallest_nonpriv_port rw   1024    --         1024      1024-32768



     Example 11 Configuring Global IPv4 Forwarding


     The following command sequence configures global  IPv4  for-
     warding and overrides that setting for interface net0.


       # ipadm set-prop -p forwarding=on ipv4
       # ipadm set-ifprop -p forwarding=off -m ipv4 net0
       # ipadm show-prop -p forwarding ipv4
       PROTO PROPERTY              PERM CURRENT PERSISTENT DEFAULT POSSIBLE
       ipv4  forwarding            rw   on      on         off   on,off

       # show-ifprop -p forwarding -m ipv4 net0
       IFNAME PROPERTY        PROTO PERM CURRENT PERSISTENT DEFAULT  POSSIBLE
       net0   forwarding      ipv4  rw   off     off        off      on,off

     Example 12 Using Qualifiers in set-prop Subcommand


     The following command sequence uses the plus and  minus  (+,
     -)   qualifiers  to  add  1047,  1048,  and  1049  as  extra
     privileged ports for TCP.


       # ipadm set-prop -p extra_priv_ports=1047 tcp
       # ipadm set-prop -p extra_priv_ports+=1048 tcp
       # ipadm set-prop -p extra_priv_ports+=1049 tcp
       # ipadm set-prop -p extra_priv_ports+=1050 tcp




     The following command deletes 1048 as extra privileged port.


       # ipadm set-prop -p extra_priv_ports-=1048




     The following command  displays  all  the  extra  privileged
     ports for TCP.


       # ipadm show-prop -p extra_priv_ports tcp
       PROTO PROPERTY             PERM CURRENT    PERSISTENT  DEFAULT   POSSIBLE
       ipv4  extra_priv_ports     rw   1047,1049, 1047,1049,  2049,4045 1-65535
                                       1050   1050



     Example 13 Enabling and Disabling Objects


     The following command sequences enables and disables  inter-
     face  and  address  objects and display the results of those
     actions.


       # ipadm create-ip net1
       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=10.2.3.4/24 net1/v4static
       # ipadm set-addrprop -p private=yes net1/v4static
       # ipadm show-addr net1/v4static
       ADDROBJ        TYPE   STATE     ADDR
       net1/v4static  static ok        10.2.3.4/24

     The  following   command   disables   the   address   object
     net1/v4static.


       # ipadm disable-addr -t net1/v4static
       # ipadm show-addr net1/v4static
       ADDROBJ        TYPE   STATE     ADDR
       net1/v4static  static ok        10.2.3.4/24




     The following command disables the interface object net1.


       # ipadm disable-if -t net1
       # ipadm show-if net1 -o all
       IFNAME     CLASS    STATE    ACTIVE CURRENT       PERSISTENT OVER
       net1       ip       disabled no     bm----------  --46       --




     The following command enables the interface object from  the
     persistent configuration.


       # ipadm enable-if -t net1
       # ipadm show-if net1 -o all
       IFNAME     CLASS    STATE    ACTIVE CURRENT       PERSISTENT OVER
       net1       ip       ok       yes    bm--------46  --46       --

       # ipadm show-addr net1/v4static
       ADDROBJ        TYPE   STATE     ADDR
       net1/v4static  static ok        10.2.3.4/24




     Note that when the  interface  object  is  enabled  all  the
     address  objects  configured  on  that interface are enabled
     also.



     The following command creates persistent  configuration  for
     the net0 interface in a non-global exclusive-IP zone so that
     the net0 interface  will  be  configured  with  the  set  of
     addresses   made   available   through  the  allowed-address
     resource from the global zone on the next reboot.

       # ipadm create-ip net0




     The net0 interface can also be configured with the available
     set of allowed-address values in the non-global exclusive-IP
     zone without a reboot by executing the following commands:


       # ipadm disable-if -t net0
       # ipadm enable-if -t net0



     Example 14 Creating IPMP Interfaces


     The following command sequence creates an IPMP interface and
     adds underlying interfaces to it.


       # ipadm create-ip e1000g0
       # ipadm create-ip e1000g1
       # ipadm create-ip e1000g2
       # ipadm set-ifprop -p standby=on -m ip e1000g2
       # ipadm create-ipmp testgroup0
       # ipadm add-ipmp -i e1000g0 -i e1000g1 -i e1000g2 testgroup0
       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=192.168.80.5/24 testgroup0/data1
       # ipadm create-addr -T static -a local=192.168.80.6/24 testgroup0/data2
       # ipadm show-if
       IFNAME     CLASS    STATE    ACTIVE OVER
       lo0        loopback ok       yes    --
       net0       ip       ok       yes    --
       e1000g0    ip       ok       yes    --
       e1000g1    ip       ok       yes    --
       ipmp0      ipmp     ok       yes    e1000g0 e1000g1




     The following command  sequence  disables  and  subsequently
     enables the IPMP interface.


       # ipadm disable-if -t testgroup0
       ipadm show-if
       IFNAME     CLASS    STATE    ACTIVE OVER
       lo0        loopback ok       yes    --
       net0       ip       ok       yes    --
       e1000g0    ip       disabled no     --
       e1000g1    ip       disabled no     --
       ipmp0      ipmp     disabled no     e1000g0 e1000g1
       # ipadm enable-if -t testgroup0




     The following command sequence removes underlying  interface
     from the IPMP interface and then deletes the IPMP interface.


       ipadm remove-ipmp -i e1000g0 -i e1000g1 testgroup0
       ipadm delete-ipmp testgroup0



     Example 15 Displaying Help


     The following command illustrates the use of the  help  sub-
     command without any arguments.


       # ipadm help
       The following subcommands are supported:
       Address subcommands           : create-addr, delete-addr, disable-addr,
                                       down-addr, enable-addr, refresh-addr,
                                       reset-addrprop, set-addrprop, show-addr,
                                       show-addrprop, up-addr
       Interface subcommands         : disable-if, enable-if, reset-ifprop,
                                       set-ifprop, show-if, show-ifprop
       IP interface subcommands      : create-ip, delete-ip
       IPMP interface subcommands    : add-ipmp, create-ipmp, delete-ipmp,
                                       remove-ipmp
       Protocol property subcommands : reset-prop, set-prop, show-prop
       VNI interface subcommands     : create-vni, delete-vni
       For more info, run: ipadm help subcommand




     The following command illustrates the use of the  help  sub-
     command with a subcommand argument.


       # ipadm help create-ipmp
       usage:
           create-ipmp    [-t] [-i under-interface[,...]]
           ... IPMP-interface

       example:
           # ipadm create-ipmp -i net0,net1 ipmp0

Attributes
     See attributes(5) for descriptions of the  following  attri-
     butes:



     tab() box; cw(2.75i) |cw(2.75i) lw(2.75i) |lw(2.75i)  ATTRI-
     BUTE  TYPEATTRIBUTE  VALUE  _  Availabilitysystem/core-os  _
     Interface StabilityCommitted

See Also
     read(1),  arp(1M),  cfgadm(1M),  dhcpagent(1M),   dladm(1M),
     if_mpadm(1M),   ifconfig(1M),   in.ndpd(1M),  in.mpathd(1M),
     ndd(1M),      netadm(1M),      netcfg(1M),      zonecfg(1M),
     nsswitch.conf(4), attributes(5), dhcp(5), vni(7d)


     Oracle Solaris Tunable Parameters Reference Manual


     Postel, J., RFC 791, Internet Protocol - DARPA Internet Pro_gram
     Protocol Specification, Information Sciences Institute,
     University of Southern California, September 1981.


     Hinden, R. and S. Deering, IP Version 6 Addressing Architec_ture,
     RFC 4291, February 2006.


     Thomson, S., Narten,  T.,  and  T.  Jinmei,  IPv6  Stateless
     Address AutoConfiguration, RFC 4862, September 2007.


     Droms, R., Bound, J., Volz, B., Lemon, T., Perkins, C.,  and
     M.  Carney,  Dynamic  Host  Configuration  Protocol for IPv6
     (DHCPv6), RFC 3315, July 2003.


     Narten, T., Draves, R., and S. Krishnan, Privacy  Extensions
     for  Stateless  Address AutoConfiguration in IPv6, RFC 4941,
     September 2007.


     S. Routhier, Ed., Management Information Base for the Inter_net
     Protocol (IP), RFC 4293, April 2006


     Braden, R., RFC 1122,  Requirements  for  Internet  Hosts  Communication
     Layers,   Information  Sciences  Institute,
     University of Southern California, October 1989.
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